Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy, 31 March – 1 April 2017

The IRH-ICUB and the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest are happy to announce the 6th edition of the Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy.

31 March – 1st of April 2017

Keynote Speakers: Sarah Hutton (University of York)
Scott Mandelbrote (University of Cambridge)
Tinca Prunea Bretonnet (IRH-ICUB)

Venue: IRH-ICUB & Faculty of Philosophy

BGCEMP poster

The sixth edition of the Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy will take place at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest, in 31 March and the 1st of April 2017. This edition is organized by the IRH-ICUB and the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest. Advanced MA and PhD student working in the field of Early Modern Philosophy are encouraged to participate.

Program:

Friday, 31 March, Institute for Research in the Humanities, 1 Dimitrie Brandza str.

9.00 – 9.30 – Coffee & Opening Address

Session 1 – Chair: Mihnea Dobre
9.30 – 10.30 – Keynote lecture: Sarah Hutton (University of York) – The Moral Philosophy of Henry More
10.30 – 10.40 – Coffee break
10.40 – 11.20 – Bogdan Deznan (University of Bucharest) – The New Covenant and the Divine Life: Henry More’s Christology in Focus
11.20 – 12.00 – Yongguang Nong (Edinburgh University) – Hume’s two versions of true religion
12.00 – 12.10 – Coffee break
12.10 – 12.50 – Ovidiu Babeș (University of Bucharest) – Instances of Descartes’s early projectionism
12.50 – 13.30 – Liana Tukhvatulina (Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow) – Hobbes vs Kelsen: on the possibility of independence of legal thinking

13.30 – 15.00 – Lunch break

Session 2 – Chair: Dana Jalobeanu
15.00 – 15.40 – Olivér István Tóth (Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest/Alpen-Adria Universität Klagenfurt) – An argument for cognitive phenomenology in Spinoza’s Ethics
15.40 – 16.20 – Assaf Rotbard (Ben Gurion University) – The double-tier structure of consciousness in Spinoza’s Ethics
16.20 – 16.30 – Coffee break
16.30 – 17.10 – Matteo Bonifacio (University of Turin) – The Two Faces of Spinozism
17.10 – 17.50 – Remus Manoilă (University of Bucharest) – The fall of Monarchy: Isaac Newton’s reading of Tertullian
17.50 – 18.00 – Coffee break
18.00 – 19.00 – Keynote lecture: Scott Mandelbrote (University of Cambridge) – Isaac Newton as a User of Books

Saturday, 1 April, Faculty of Philosophy, 204 Splaiul Independentei
9.00 – 9.30 – Coffee

Session 3 – Chair: Sarah Hutton
9.30 – 10.30 – Keynote lecture: Tinca Prunea Bretonnet (University of Bucharest) – Mathematics and its role in philosophy: the controversy on method in the German Enlightenment
10.30 – 10.40 – Coffee break
10.40 – 11.20 – Vlad Dolghi (University of Bucharest) – The role of mathematics in Maupertuis’ epistemology and natural philosophy
11.20 – 12.00 – Joseph Rees (Georgetown University) – The Two Faces of Amour-Propre
12.00 – 12.40 – Natalia Borza (Pázmány Péter Catholic University) – Backstage Confidence. The nature and limits of philosophical enquiries in Adam Smith’s Essays. A sceptical reading of the history of natural philosophy

12.40 – 14.30 – Lunch

Session 4 – Chair: Tinca Prunea Bretonnet
14.30 – 15.10 – Laurynas Adomaitis (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa) – ‘Simplicity’ and Method of Analogy in Leibniz‘s Physics
15.10 – 15.50 – Carlos Portales (University of Edinburgh) – Possible worlds and nature’s value in Leibniz
15.50 – 16.10 – Coffee break
16.10 – 16.50 – Austen Haynes (Boston University) – Dancing Triangles Eating Roast Beef: John Norris’s Defense of the Real Distinction Between Mind and Body
16.50 – 17.30 – David Bartha (CEU Budapest) – Occasionalism, voluntarism and Berkeley