Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy, 24-28 June 2019

Dates: 24-28.06.2019

Place: Bran

Topic: The Eclectic Scientific Revolution?

Abstract: The Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy has a long tradition of challenging current assumptions about the birth of the modern science, and exploring hidden corners of early modern thought, from the losers of the so-called Scientific Revolution to obscure and forgotten figures, to the reevaluation of canonical thinkers. This year, we would like to investigate the idea of an ‘eclectic scientific revolution.’

 

The “new science” that is supposed to havePoster Bucharest-Princeton Seminar (web) emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is often characterized as mathematical, or experimental, or mechanical. Different narratives emphasize different features of the new science in different combinations, but it is often assumed that these different features are consistent with one another, and jointly characterize the new science that emerges in the period and challenges the Aristotelian orthodoxy of the schools. We would like to problematize this assumption and explore ways in which these different approaches and values compete and coexist with one another both within individual figures and across different thinkers in the period. Is the so-called “new science” that emerges in the period a unified intellectual program, or is it an eclectic and disunified collection of competing projects?

The format of the seminar will be similar to that which we have followed in previous years. There will be reading groups in the morning, where we examine common texts together, followed by work in progress presented by participants in the afternoon. We welcome individual paper submissions on any topic connected with the broad themes of the seminar.

 

Participants: Ovidiu Babeș (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Andreas Blank (Bard College Berlin), Haley Brennan (Princeton University), Bogdan Deznan (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Mihnea Dobre (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Claudia Dumitru (Princeton University), Dan Garber (Princeton University), Rodolfo Garrau (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia), Stefano Gulizia (New Europe College), Dana Jalobeanu (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Alexandru Liciu (University of Bucharest), Scott Mandelbrote (Cambridge University), Daniela Maria (University of Bucharest), Oana Matei (New Europe College/ ICUB, University of Bucharest/ “Vasile Goldis” University Arad), Matheus Monteiro (University of Campinas/ Princeton University) Alessandro Nannini (New Europe College/ ICUB, University of Bucharest), Pietro Omodeo (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia), Tinca Prunea-Bretonnet (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Diana Stere (University of Bucharest), Grigore Vida (ICUB, University of Bucharest).

Organizing committee: Mihnea Dobre (ICUB, University of Bucharest), Dan Garber (Princeton University), Oana Matei (New Europe College/ ICUB, University of Bucharest/ “Vasile Goldis” University Arad).
Local organizing team: Ovidiu Babeș, Bogdan Deznan, Claudia Dumitru, Grigore Vida.

The seminar is supported by the Princeton University, the Research Institute of the University of Bucharest (ICUB), and the following research grants: PN-III-P1-1.1-TE-2016-0710, PN-III-P1-1.1-TE-2016-2299, PNIII- P4-ID- PCE 2016-0228.

 

Provisional program:

Day 1 (25 June)

09:30-10:30 Reading group: The (In)Finite Divisibility of Matter: Charleton, Newton, Cavendish, Digby (Ovidiu Babes & Haley Brennan & Claudia Dumitru & Grigore Vida)

10:30-11:00 Coffee break

11:00-12:30 Reading group: The (In)Finite Divisibility of Matter: Charleton, Newton, Cavendish, Digby (Ovidiu Babes & Haley Brennan & Claudia Dumitru & Grigore Vida)

15:30-16:00 Alessandro Nannini, From Christ the Physician to the Christian Physician. Medical Theology and Theological Medicine in Early Modern Germany

16:00-16:30 Tinca Prunea-Bretonnet, Galen vs. Cicero: What Model for Enlightened Eclectic Philosophy?

16:30-16:45 Coffee break

16:45-17:15 Oana Matei, “In Service of Public Good”: Bacon and Maupertuis on the Production and Administration of Knowledge

17:15-17:45 Alex Liciu, Francis Bacon and Robert Hooke on the Transmutation of Species

17:45-18:00 Coffee break

18:00-18:30 Dan Garber, Margaret Cavendish among the Baconians

 

Day 2 (26 June)

09:30-10:30 Reading group: Cartesian Cosmology (Mihnea Dobre & Dan Gaber & Scott Mandelbrote)

10:30-11:00 Coffee break

11:00-12:30 Reading group: Cartesian Cosmology (Mihnea Dobre & Dan Gaber & Scott Mandelbrote)

15:30-16:00 Ovidiu Babes, Roberval on the Principles of the Heavens

16:00-16:30 Rodolfo Garau, Some Highly Unprovable Hypothesis on the Controversy between Gassendi and Morin

16:30-16:45 Coffee break

16:45-17:15 Grigore Vida, Newton’s “Preface” to the Principia and Proclus’ Commentary on the First Book of Euclid’s Elements

17:15-17:45 Pietro Omodeo, Cesare Cremonini on the Heavens: Ontological Problems of Preclassical Celestial Physics

 

Day 3 (27 June)

09:30-10:30 Reading group: Nature (with)out God (Pietro Omodeo & Rodolfo Garau)

10:30-11:00 Coffee break

11:00-12:30 Reading group: Nature (with)out God (Pietro Omodeo & Rodolfo Garau)

15:30-16:00 Matheus Monteiro, From the Unchangeable Sky to the New Stars: Generation and Corruption of Celestial Bodies in Early Modern Philosophy

16:00-16:30 Dana Jalobeanu, Eclectic Interpretations of the Historical Past: Fables, Cosmology and the Timaean Tradition

16:30-16:45 Coffee break

16:45-17:15 Stefano Gulizia, The Copernicus of the Scandinavian Clerici Vagantes: Heliocentric Debates and Early Modern Natural Philosophy across the Baltic Region

17:15-17:45 Bogdan Deznan, The God of the Platonists in 17th Century England Ralph Cudworth and the Metaphysics of Difference

17:45-18:00 Coffee break

18:00-18:30 Andreas Blank, Christian Wolff on Common Notions and Duties of Esteem

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