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Our Mission

The IRH-ICUB is a research division of The Research Institute of the University of Bucharest. Our mission is to promote and stimulate outstanding research in the humanities. The institute encourages international projects in disciplines such as history, philology, philosophy, intellectual history and religious studies, as well as interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary projects.

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New Seminar – The grant proposal: from research design to writing strategies

Mihnea Dobre (IRH-ICUB) and Ionuț Epurescu-Pascovici (New Europe College)

This series of workshops aims to provide a venue for humanities and social sciences researchers to meet, share their experiences, receive hands-on advice on grant writing, and collaborate on their grant applications for national and European calls. It is hoped that out of this workshop series a small community of researchers will emerge who will continue to offer mutual support for grant applications through constructive criticism and peer-review. More details here

Seminar – Memory: From Brains to Narratives

The seminar Memory: From Brains to Narratives is convened by Dr. Lorena Anton, being constructed as an opportunity for interdisciplinary discussions between specialists in anthropology, history, medicine, neuroscience, philology and linguistics, psychology, philosophy and sociology. Its aim is to bring together and deconstruct past and present ideas about the place of memory in human history, and to open doors towards the future of its contemporary evolution.

Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science

The seventh edition of the Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science aims to bring together an interdisciplinary group of historians and philosophers interested in the interplay between theory and experimental practices in the 16th–18th centuries, with a special focus on the emergence of experimental philosophy. We invite papers on the history of natural history, early modern experimental practices and forms of experimental methodology, as well as papers investigating the philosophical and methodological discussions surrounding the emergence of experimental philosophy.

Invited speakers: Iordan Avramov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences), Andreas Blanck(University of Paderborn & Bard College, Berlin), Arianna Borrelli (Technical University Berlin), Florike Egmont (Leiden University), Mordechai Feingold (California Institute of Technology), Raphaele Garrod (University of Cambridge), Gideon Manning (Claremont Graduate University).

New Seminar: Medieval Europe and Beyond

An informal or ‘get-together’ meeting will take place on 10 October at 17.00.

Conveners: Marian Coman (University of Bucharest) and Ionuț Epurescu-Pascovici (New Europe College).

This research working group is intended as a venue for historians, social scientists, and philosophers interested in discussing recent developments in the study of medieval Europe. Comparisons between Latin Europe, Byzantium and Islam, and between late antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the early modern period are encouraged. The research group is not limited to medievalists but open to colleagues in other fields.

For more details about the seminar and programme see the dedicated page.

Medieval Europe and Beyond

Conveners: Marian Coman (University of Bucharest; commarian@gmail.com) and Ionuț Epurescu-Pascovici (New Europe College).

This research working group is intended as a venue for historians, social scientists, and philosophers interested in discussing recent developments in the study of medieval Europe. Comparisons between Latin Europe, Byzantium and Islam, and between late antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the early modern period are encouraged. The research group is not limited to medievalists but open to colleagues in other fields.

Fortnightly meetings include roundtable discussions of recent scholarship, readings of primary sources, methodological seminars and presentations of work in progress. Readings are provided in advance. Working languages are Romanian and English.

Each academic year is dedicated to a general theme.

The theme for 2016/2017 is From Lordship to State.

It is increasingly clear that the earlier grand narrative of straightforward continuity between medieval institutional reforms and the birth of the modern state needs to be complicated in significant ways, but a nuanced understanding of the medieval institutions and practices remains essential for placing European political modernity in historical perspective. This year’s theme, From Lordship to State, charts both the diversity of medieval political forms and, more specifically, the trajectory of medieval polities from the seigneuries of the post-Carolingian era to the centralized kingdoms of the later Middle Ages.

The seminar meets on alternate Mondays from 17.00 at IRH-ICUB, 1 Dimitrie Brândză St.

First semester

An informal or ‘get-together’ meeting will take place on 10 October at 17.00.

17 October – Medieval history, modern theory (roundtable discussion)

Ph. Buc, Dangers of Ritual (2001): Introduction and chapters 3, 5, 6, and 7 (pp. 1-13, 88-123,159-263).

31 October – Beyond ‘feudalism’: the alternatives (roundtable discussion)

  1. Brown, ‘The tyranny of a construct’, Am. Hist. Rev. 79 (1974);
  2. Reynolds, Fiefs and Vassals (1994), chapters 1-3, 6.5-6.12, and 7 (pp. 1-75, 199-323);
  3. Cheyette, review of Fiefs and Vassals, Speculum 71;

Feudalism, ed. S. Bagge et al. (2011), the chapters by S. Reynolds and H. Debax (pp. 15-27 and 77-101).

14 November – Lords and fiefs: the documentary record (sources seminar)

Conventum between William V of Aquitaine and Hugh of Lusignan;

Galbert of Bruges, De multro, traditione et occisione, ed. J. Rider (1994), chapters 7-10, 31, 47, 51, 55-56;

Actes de la famille Porcelet d’Arles, ed. M. Aurell (2001), documents nos. 73, 89, 119, 155,172, 363, 611, 623.

28 November – A medieval lordship: Picquigny (I. Epurescu-Pascovici, working paper)

12 December – A ‘feudal’ mutation in 15th-century Wallachia? (M. Coman, work in progress talk)

9 January TBA

 

Second semester

Centre and periphery in medieval Europe (roundtable discussion)

  1. Bartlett, The Making of Europe (1993);
  2. Berend, At the Gate of Christendom (2006).

The twelfth century: birth of the modern state? (roundtable discussion)

Th. Bisson, The Crisis of the Twelfth Century (2008);

  1. Reynolds, ‘Government and community, 1024-1204’, NCMH vol. 4 (2004).

TBA

Beginnings of the bureaucratic state: The Dialogue of the Exchequer (sources seminar)

Dialogus de Scaccario, ed. E. Amt and S. D. Church (2008).

Accountability: medieval to modern (roundtable discussion)

  1. Murray, Reason and Society (1978);
  2. Sabapathy, Officers and Accountability (2014);
  3. Soll, The Reckoning (2014).

Reading the Savoyard computi (I. Epurescu-Pascovici, methodological seminar)

The late-medieval advances in government (roundtable discussion)

  1. Watts, The making of Polities (2009);

Cl. Gauvard, De grace especial (1991).

New norms and old habits: judicial practices in 16th-century Wallachia (M. Coman,

working paper)

TBA

Renaissance state and society (sources seminar)